Verbs of Genitive Case

2 October 2013 by Pigmalijonas

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A verb may require not only the accusative case - it may as well take the genitive, dative or instrumental case.

Let's take a couple of verbs that require the genitive:

laukti - to wait
nekęsti - to hate

Their present tense 3rd person (jis, ji, jie, jos) are laukia and nekenčia.

You ought to memorize:

laukti : laukia
nekęsti : nekenčia

Let's use some genitive objects with these new verbs:

laukiu brolio. I wait for (my) brother.
Brolis laukia tėvo, bet jis nekenčia jo. Brother is waiting for father, but he hates him.
nekenčiu televizor! I hate TVs!
Tu perki pieštuką, nes nekenti tušinukų. You buy a pencil, because you hate pens.
Jei perkame kilimus, tai laukiame kilimų. If we buy carpets, then we wait for carpets.
Kodėl jūs nekenčiate mūsų vyrų? Why do you hate our men?

Do you notice how the new verbs transform their objects into the genitive case?

Word Meaning
laukti wait
nekęsti hate

Comments:

Duda 16 December 2015 21:41
Re: Brolis laukia tėvo, bet jis nekenčia jo. Brother is waiting for father, but he hates him.

Shouldn't it be: Brolis laukia tėvo, bet jis JĮ nekenčia. Brother is waiting for father, but he hates him.
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Pigmalijonas 20 July 2016 09:11
No, "nekęsti" requires the object to be in the genitive case: jis jo nekenčia
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